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A new study from Harvard has found that when it comes to astrology the influence of the sun has an impact on everything from weight gain and diabetes to mental health and even death.

The study, published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, looks at the influence on weight gain, diabetes, depression and heart disease of the influence a constellation of seven stars, known as the Big Dipper, on people.

Astrologers said that the results show that the Big Dips can actually have a significant impact on a person’s health and that people with a constellation may have more than one star at a time.

For example, if you have one star with the Sun, you may have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes or heart disease.

And if you also have one or more other stars, you are more likely to develop obesity, depression or heart failure.

“We’re looking at the combination of the Big Dip and the Sun,” said Dr. Amy J. Shulman, associate professor of integrative medicine and chief medical officer at the Harvard Medical School.

“And there is evidence that the Sun is the most important star in the sky.”

According to Dr. Shullman, the study also shows that the influence that the stars have on the health of the body varies depending on the type of person, whether they are obese or not, and whether they have diabetes or high blood pressure.

In addition, the star-related effects of the stars on the body are linked to other things as well.

One of the researchers noted that the impact of the Sun on the heart and the heart of the person with diabetes may vary depending on whether they had a heart attack or not.

“If you have diabetes and a heart condition, it might have an effect on your blood pressure and your heart rate, which could be a risk factor for heart attack,” Dr. Joseph F. Dannenfelser, an associate professor at Harvard Medical Center and a member of the Harvard team, said.

“If you don’t have diabetes, it doesn’t seem to have any effect on heart rate.”

Dr. Shuelman said that a number of factors may play a role in how much a person is influenced by their constellation.

People with diabetes, for example, may be more susceptible to heart disease, and people with high blood pressures may be at higher risk for heart attacks and strokes.

“What we think is really interesting about our study is that we looked at what kind of impact different combinations of the six stars have in relation to various aspects of health,” Dr Shullmans said.

She added that other researchers have looked at whether different types of people are more susceptible than others to certain health conditions.

“There’s been some research that indicates that the more people have the Big Ups, the more likely they are to have a heart problem,” Dr Dannfenelser said.

But the Harvard researchers found that the overall effect on health is not quite as great when it is combined with a number other factors.

For instance, the Big T-stars, the stars with which people with diabetes and hypertension have a similar constellation, were not linked to any increased risk of heart disease or stroke, for instance.

And a person with high cholesterol and hypertension did not seem to show any significant benefit to health from having a constellation.

The researchers also looked at the relationship between the six-star constellation and other factors, including a person s health status, socioeconomic status, weight, height and a person having diabetes.

And, for the study, the researchers looked at people who had a history of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

People with diabetes who had the Big Stars were also more likely than the rest of the population to have hypertension, type 2, and type 3 diabetes, which is a form of heart failure that affects about a third of people, the Harvard investigators reported.

And the Big Insights had a stronger relationship to type 2 than did the Big-Insights or the Big Twins.

“I think what we see is that people who have more star-type influences on their health are less likely to have an increased risk for these types of things,” Dr Jurgen Buhle, a professor of preventive medicine and director of the Diabetes and Obesity Program at the Cleveland Clinic, said in a statement.

Dr Shulmans said that people should focus on how their health is impacted by their health issues.

“This study is really an opportunity to learn about the relationships between the health status of a person and their star-signs,” Dr Buhl said.

“It’s also important to consider the impact that the other factors that affect health, such as socioeconomic status and obesity, may have on health outcomes.

We’re really interested in understanding how those interactions can contribute to health outcomes.”